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Top 10 NEW reasons to join the Minnesota Health Strategy and Communications Network

04/26/2017 3:27 PM | Ryan Davenport (Administrator)
1.       Meet witty, liberal arts colleagues who probably enjoyed working on yearbook committee, hated math and decided not to go to law school after college.

2.       Collect business cards from interesting new contacts, file in double-secret folder, follow contacts on Twitter, connect on LinkedIn, and eventually discover the shared joy of rooftop lawn bowling.1

3.       Don’t “get” marketing? Attend a conference, sit at table with marketing pros, pass water pitcher, accept offer of bread, earn genuine “cross-functional” experience, note on resume.2

4.       Uncomfortable with PR’s overuse of the word ‘leverage’? Leverage your fear of leverage in frank conversation with supportive peers during judgement-free social hour.

5.       Free Wi-Fi at MHSCN conferences allows you to check work email or tout new knowledge on social media while colleagues back at the office wonder what’s gotten into you.

6.       Exclusive access to online membership directory refreshingly includes no swipe left or right feature.

7.       Re-cast worst nightmare work blunders as helpful tips to share at fabulous MHSCN networking events. (Example: “Carl, did you know Spellcheck won’t catch misspelled news release headlines written in all caps? It’s true!)3

8.       Proudly announce to Mom and Dad that through MHSCN, you’ve learned how to meaningfully engage KOL’s, bloggers and other key stakeholders by leveraging geo-targeted, multi-channel integrated marketing and PR campaigns that align with and support your brand proposition, yielding dynamic and actionable outcomes.

9.       Three words: Stop. Career. Stagnation.

10.   Love to proofread and edit for flow and style? Mark up tiresome “Top 10 reasons to join MHSCN” document with red pen and submit to ryan@davenpr.com. Wait for sarcastic thank-you response.

Footnotes/Disclaimers

1.        Discovering shared joy of rooftop lawn bowling not typical; networking results may vary.
2.        Cross-functional experience typically involves meaningful collaborations with disparate work teams; always be truthful on your resume.
3.        Worst nightmare work blunder example cited may or may not necessarily be drawn from author’s actual experience.


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